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Apollo 10 CM "Charlie Brown" Flown Hatch Boost Cover Release Label

This is one of the rarest pieces of Apollo 10 history we have ever come across! This boost cover release label was originally from the Apollo 10 Command Module "Charlie Brown" astronaut access hatch and came from the collection of a North American Aviation employee.

$40000
In stock
Only 1 left
SKU
AP10-COL-19

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This is one of the rarest and one-of-a-kind pieces of Apollo 10 history we have ever come across! This boost cover release label was the one used on the Apollo 10 Command Module "Charlie Brown" astronaut access hatch and came from the collection of a North American Aviation (which later went on to become Rockwell International) employee responsible for the deactivation and decontamination of the post-flight Command Modules.

After returning to Earth each Command Module underwent decontamination and decommissioning. During this process, the kapton foil surrounding the spacecraft was removed and discarded, and the hatch door labels were destined to meet the same fate. Remarkably, this one was saved and kept by one of the recovery crew where it remained in their collection until we acquired it.

Through extensive research and photo matching, we can conclude with absolute certainty that this was the very same label from the Charlie Brown primary access hatch. A full research paper is included with this artifact with all of the specific information regarding authenticity.

Includes:

  • Complete research paper detailing all authenticating factors
  • Certificate of Authenticity with holographic logo and company stamp
  • Notarized Certificate of Authenticity from the collection source
  • Copy of further official documents, awards, and badges from the collection source
  • Comes protected in a museum-grade Perspex VA 004 acrylic display

Authentication Information:

The one-of-a-kind Apollo 10 CM hatch label was acquired in person by a North American Aviation manager and comes with complete documentation, employee documents, and passes, as well as a complete research paper.

Lifetime Guarantee of Authenticity:

All of our artifacts are thoroughly and extensively researched before being listed for sale, so much so that we're proud to offer a lifetime guarantee of authenticity for this and other artifacts listed throughout our website. We also hold a record of every piece we sell which can be identified and searched in our online database using the serial number listed on your certificate of authenticity.

About the Boost Cover Release:

The boost cover release label was designed to indicate to the ground crew where to insert the necessary tool to release the boost cover in the event of an emergency on the pad. This action would allow the ground crew to get the crew out as quickly as possible, a system developed after the tragic Apollo 1 fire.

The boost cover itself was part of the launch escape subsystem which was designed to carry the com­mand module containing the astronauts away from the launch vehicle in case of an emergency on the pad or shortly after launch. The subsystem would carry the CM to a sufficient height and off to the side, away from the launch vehicle, so that the earth landing subsystem could operate. The subsystem was the large rocket-like spire con­nected to the Command Module by a lattice-work tower. It was 33 feet long, had a maximum diameter of 4 feet and weighed approximately 8,000 pounds.

The forward or rocket section of the subsystem was cylindrical and housed three solid-propellant rocket motors and ballast compartments topped by a nose cone containing instruments. The tower was made of titanium tubes attached at the top to a structural skirt that covered the rocket exhaust nozzles and at the bottom to the Command Module by means of an explosive connection.

The boost protective cover was attached to the tower and completely covered the Command Module. This cover protected the Command Module from the rocket exhaust and also from the heating generated by the launch vehicles ascent through the atmosphere. It remained attached to the tower and was carried away when the launch escape assembly was jettisoned. The subsystem activated automatically by the emergency detection system in the first 100 seconds or manually by the astronauts at any time from the pad to jettison altitude. With the Saturn V, the subsystem was jettisoned at about 295,000 feet, or about 30 seconds after the ignition of the second stage.

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